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The Best Lenses for the Nikon Z7

Bret Leon Avatar
Bret Leon
17 October, 2022 • Updated 20 days ago
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The Best Lenses for the Nikon Z7
Introducing a new system is challenging, and history shows that it takes at least two or three generations of cameras to win over the public. But in a field as cutthroat as photography, time was not on Nikon’s side.

Competitors had already established themselves and built up a sizable inventory of lenses designed specifically for their respective systems’ native mounts. Because of this, the corporation focused on creating a camera system that was not only ready to use, but also compatible with all previously released Nikon F mount lenses.

And in September 2018, Nikon announced its Z7 full-frame, high-resolution, mirrorless camera. The announcement included a 24-megapixel sister and three Z-mount lenses. Nikon’s first full-frame mirrorless camera uses a modified version of the D850’s 46MP BSI CMOS sensor and adds on-sensor phase detection AF pixels and mechanical stabilization.

The Z7’s exceptional real-world performance, though, is what sets it apart.  I had a hard time putting down the Z7 since I found it to be so enjoyable to use – and you usually won’t find me setting my DSLR cameras down.

In this article, we will review the best lenses for the Nikon Z7. Since every available choice comes with its own pros and cons, it can be hard to decide between them. So let me help you choose the best option for your camera body.

Related Post: Best Lens for the Nikon Z6 II

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Products Features
EDITOR’S PICK
4.8
+150
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NIKON NIKKOR Z 70-200mm f/2.8 S
NIKON NIKKOR Z 70-200mm f/2.8 SNIKON NIKKOR Z 70-200mm f/2.8 S
  • Angle of View — 34° 20′ to 12° 20
  • Tripod Collar — Removable and Rotating
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $2800
  • Angle of View — 34° 20′ to 12° 20
  • Tripod Collar — Removable and Rotating
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $2800
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TOP PICK
5
59
59
NIKON NIKKOR Z 14-24mm f/2.8 S
NIKON NIKKOR Z 14-24mm f/2.8 SNIKON NIKKOR Z 14-24mm f/2.8 S
  • Filter Size — 112 mm (via Hood)
  • Dimensions (ø x L) — 3.5 x 4.9″ / 88.5 x 124.5 mm
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $2500
  • Filter Size — 112 mm (via Hood)
  • Dimensions (ø x L) — 3.5 x 4.9″ / 88.5 x 124.5 mm
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $2500
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MOST REVIEWED
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+470
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NIKON NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S
NIKON NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 SNIKON NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 1.25′ / 38 cm
  • Diaphragm Blades — 9
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $3200
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 1.25′ / 38 cm
  • Diaphragm Blades — 9
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $3200
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BUDGET PICK
4.6
+30
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Venus Laowa 100mm f/2.8
Venus Laowa 100mm f/2.8Venus Laowa 100mm f/2.8
  • Optical Design — 12 Elements in 10 Groups
  • Macro Reproduction Ratio — 2:1
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $500
  • Optical Design — 12 Elements in 10 Groups
  • Macro Reproduction Ratio — 2:1
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $500
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Best Lenses for the Nikon Z7 Reviewed

NIKON NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S

NIKON NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S

Features

  • Focal Length — 24 to 70mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/2.8
  • Minimum Aperture — f/22
  • Lens Mount — Nikon Z
  • Lens Format Coverage — Full-Frame
  • Angle of View — 84° to 34° 20′
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 1.25′ / 38 cm
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.22x
  • Optical Design — 17 Elements in 15 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 9
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — No
  • Filter Size — 82 mm (Front)
  • Dimensions (ø x L) — 3.5 x 4.96″ / 89 x 126 mm
  • Length at Maximum Extension — 6.15″ / 156.3 mm
  • Weight — 28.4 oz / 805 g

Nikon’s promise of higher image quality and optical features for the Z mirrorless system’s lenses over their DSLR F-mount siblings began with the Nikon Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S lens.

The 24-70mm focal length on FX-format bodies (or the 36-105mm equivalent on DX-format bodies) makes it ideal for a wide variety of photography, from landscapes and street photography to portraits, weddings, and events. It’s not only great for taking still images but it can also be used as a makeshift macro lens in a pinch and it’s designed for filming.

Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8 S is the lightest and among the smallest lenses of its kind for a mirrorless camera, and while it’s still not a small lens, it’s a lot smaller and significantly lighter than its DSLR counterpart. Its sleek design works beautifully with the Z7. Due to its metal and plastic construction, this f/2.8 lens is not as heavy as you may think.

The new multi-focus system works in a way that’s comparable to some of Sony’s top-tier G Master lenses—that is, by employing numerous autofocus motors and groups to boost performance—with one key distinction, however: the system is noticeably quicker. Nikon’s lens uses two stepper motor AF actuators to simultaneously move two focus groups, while most modern Sony lenses rely on fast linear focus motors.

Regarding image quality, the Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8 delivers a strong showing. It outperforms its bulkier F-mount forerunner in almost every way, except sun stars and occasional bokeh problems. The lens has a close-focus distance of 15 inches (0.37 meters) and a magnification of 1:4.2 in manual focus at 70mm, making it suitable for both general-purpose use and the production of very crisp photos of products, food, and drinks.

Lens flare doesn’t seem to be an issue at all. This lens performs admirably in high-contrast lighting, and ghosting is kept to a minimum. The fluorine coating on the front and rear lens elements of the 24-70mm f/2.8 S lens makes it resistant to dust, moisture, smudges, and fingerprints. Additionally, the lens hood is felt-coated to block light leaks and avoid flare.

For those that shoot with Nikon’s Z-mount, the Nikkor Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S is a premium option. The 24-70mm f/2.8 S is an outstanding lens that lives up to mirrorless’s lofty expectations. Even while it may focus a tad more slowly than its SLR equivalent, the widely used AF-S 24-70mm f/2.8 E ED VR, this lens provides outstanding optical performance and is without a doubt Nikon’s best 24-70mm f/2.8 zoom to date.

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Pros
  • Incredibly sharp
  • Decent close-up focusing ability
  • Excellent weather sealing
  • No chromatic aberration
  • Excellent for video
  • Programmable control button
  • Quick, silent autofocus
Cons
  • Heavy and bulky
  • Expensive
  • Visible vignette
  • Sensitive control ring

NIKON NIKKOR Z 14-24mm f/2.8 S

NIKON NIKKOR Z 14-24mm f/2.8 S

Features

  • Focal Length — 14 to 24mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/2.8
  • Minimum Aperture — f/22
  • Lens Mount — Nikon Z
  • Lens Format Coverage — Full-Frame
  • Angle of View — 114° to 84°
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 11″ / 28 cm
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.13x
  • Optical Design — 16 Elements in 11 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 9, Rounded
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — No
  • Filter Size — 112 mm (via Hood)
  • Dimensions (ø x L) — 3.5 x 4.9″ / 88.5 x 124.5 mm
  • Weight — 1.4 lb / 650 g

The iconic ultra-wide 14-24mm f/2.8 lens now has a modern mirrorless counterpart with the same fast and continuous f/2.8 aperture as its F-mount forerunner. It has fantastic functionality, a robust and fashionable construction, and excellent image quality. It even has its own lens hood that can be attached to a filter through a screw.

One of its most appealing qualities is the complete extra f-stop it gives photographers. This is especially true when comparing this lens to the 24-70mm f/2.8 and the 70-200mm f/2.8 as a  trinity of optics.

The 14-24mm f/2.8 S lens is a significant improvement over its f-mount forerunner in terms of weight, size, and AF speed.

For many users, the fact that the Z-mount version of the 14-24mm f/2.8 lens weighs around 350 grams (0.77 pounds) less than the F-mount version is enough to sway their decision. The Nikon weather seals ensure that the camera can be used in any weather, no matter how severe.

Although the Nikon Z 14-24mm f/2.8 S lens is exceptionally crisp, it nonetheless has considerable barrel and pincushion distortion at its maximum, as is the case with almost all ultra-wide-angle lenses.

It’s no exaggeration to say that the Nikon Z 14-24mm f/2.8 S lens is among the best in the company’s mirrorless lineup, as it provides exceptional ultra-wide-angle image quality in a compact and lightweight design with a large range of available options for personalization and functionality enhancement. This lens is a must-have for any professional Nikon mirrorless photographer who routinely shoots landscapes, cityscapes, or the night sky with the Nikon Z7.

Pros
  • Remarkable autofocus
  • Excellent build quality
  • Advanced weather sealing
  • Anti-smudge glass coating
  • Supports front and rear filters
Cons
  • No image stabilization
  • Focus-by-wire design can be frustrating for manual focus
  • Distracting bokeh with an out-of-focus background
  • A bit heavy
  • Limited zoom range

NIKON NIKKOR Z 70-200mm f/2.8 S

NIKON NIKKOR Z 70-200mm f/2.8 S

Features

  • Focal Length — 70 to 200mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/2.8
  • Minimum Aperture — f/22
  • Lens Mount — Nikon Z
  • Angle of View — 34° 20′ to 12° 20
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 1.64′ / 50 cm
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.2x
  • Optical Design — 21 Elements in 18 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 9, Rounded
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — Yes
  • Tripod Collar — Removable and Rotating
  • Filter Size — 77 mm (Front)
  • Dimensions (ø x L) — 3.5 x 8.66″ / 89 x 220 mm
  • Length at Maximum Extension — 8.65″ / 219.8 mm
  • Weight — 2.99 lb / 1360 g

The Z 70-200mm f/2.8 is one of the market’s most capable telephoto zoom lenses. There aren’t many telephoto zooms that can compete with this one in terms of their range of uses and the quality of the images they produce.

Although it covers a wide focal range, the Z 70-200mm lens is neither compact nor lightweight. It’s a substantial piece of equipment that, when mounted to your Nikon Z7 body, will nearly double the weight of your camera and add another 8.7 inches to your overall camera length.

The closed design, however, is quite sophisticated, and the lens itself is exceedingly rugged and weatherproof. The outer lens element is fluorine-coated to make it scratch- and mark-resistant; it is one of 21 elements in 18 groups contained within the lens body.

Three focus rings and an OLED display at the very top of the lens let you keep track of what’s in focus and what’s set for the shot at the moment. The middle ring controls the shutter speed, and the outer ring controls the aperture. The middle ring is the least convenient for handheld photography, as I found myself off-balance when adjusting the aperture ring -a minor criticism, and one that can be easily remedied with the use of a tripod.

The front/outermost ring controls the lens’s focal length, while the middle ring is used for focusing and provides a pleasing experience. All of them are precisely where you need them to be, easy to operate, and pleasant to the touch.

The Nikkor Z 70-200mm delivers outstanding results in any shooting situation. The autofocus is quick and silent, and most importantly, the lens incorporates built-in stabilization, which Nikon refers to as Vibration Reduction.

While I’m happy to find that it’s well made and has a ton of useful features, the larger aperture and the resulting depth of field compression are what sold me. With the Z7, the Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 is not only a great portrait lens but also a great videography lens.

Considering its features, the Nikkor Z 70-200mm f/2.8 is a bargain despite its hefty price tag. If you absolutely require the additional sharpness and smaller f-number, it’s money well spent. You get an excellent, adaptable lens that can handle practically any shooting environment and still provide high-quality results.

Pros
  • Fast autofocus
  • Excellent optics
  • Teleconverter compatibility
  • Advanced weather sealing
  • Excellent build quality
  • Minimal focus breathing
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Focus-by-wire design can be frustrating for manual focus

Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-120mm f/4 S

Venus Laowa 100mm f2.8

Features

  • Focal Length — 100mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/2.8
  • Minimum Aperture — f/22
  • Lens Mount — Nikon Z
  • Lens Format Coverage — Full-Frame
  • Angle of View — 24.4°
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 9.72″ / 24.7 cm
  • Maximum Magnification — 2x
  • Macro Reproduction Ratio — 2:1
  • Optical Design — 12 Elements in 10 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 13
  • Focus Type — Manual Focus
  • Image Stabilization — No
  • Filter Size — 67 mm (Front)
  • Dimensions (ø x L) — 2.83 x 6.1″ / 72 x 155 mm
  • Weight — 1.4 lb / 638 g

Laowa has never been afraid to take chances! Even though it is the most traditional of their lenses, the Laowa 100mm F2.8 2x APO Macro has several characteristics that make it stand out from the crowd.

Rather than a standard 1:1 life-size ratio, the Laowa 100M macro features a 2:1 apochromatic (APO) optical design for a more impressive 2x macro ratio. In other words, while conventional macro lenses are limited to this level of magnification, the 100M is capable of even more.

There’s never been any doubt about the quality of Laowa lenses thanks to their sturdy metal frames. This lens follows suit, being constructed entirely from metal and glass. Despite its high-quality construction, the lens only weighs a manageable 1.4 pounds (638 grams).

APO (apochromatic) lenses, like the 100M, are known for producing sharp, high-contrast images due to their superior color accuracy. Apochromatic lenses have superior correction of chromatic and spherical aberration compared to standard achromatic lenses.

The harshness of the edges in the bokeh (out-of-focus) portions of an image is the trade-off for APO lenses’ high contrast and lack of chromatic aberrations.

Still, it has a major shortcoming when it comes to withstanding flares. Even with the included plastic lens hood (which doesn’t bayonet on as easily as I’d like), flare is still a problem, especially at the widest apertures (f/2.8 and f/11).

In conclusion, Laowa has made remarkable strides with the release of the 100mm F2.8 2x APO Macro. With the adoption of a more complicated lens design (electromagnetic aperture iris), they were able to produce a competitive macro lens at a shockingly low price. When used to its potential with the Z7, it creates stunning photographs, albeit achieving sharp focus can be a challenge due to the lens’s short focus throw.

Pros
  • Smooth and precise manual focusing
  • Good image quality
  • Solid build quality
  • Low cats eyes
  • Simple handleability
  • Accurate colors
Cons
  • Very short travel of focus ring
  • Ring flare with the sun in frame
  • No weather sealing

Nikon Nikkor Z 50MM F/1.8 S

Nikon Nikkor Z 50MM F/1.8 S

Features

  • Focal Length — 50mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/1.8
  • Minimum Aperture — f/16
  • Lens Mount — Nikon Z
  • Lens Format Coverage — Full-Frame
  • Angle of View — 47°
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 1.31′ / 40 cm
  • Optical Design — 12 Elements in 9 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 9, Rounded
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — No
  • Filter Size — 62 mm (Front)
  • Dimensions (ø x L) — 2.99 x 3.41″ / 76 x 86.5 mm
  • Weight — 14.64 oz / 415 g

A standard prime is seen as a necessary component of any system, whether it is well-established or newly introduced, therefore Nikon’s inclusion of a 50mm f/1.8 lens in the initial lineup of Z-mount optics was not surprising.

Since high-quality lenses can be constructed with an f/1.8 aperture, I find that they are an ideal starting point for any kind of photography. Fast enough for portraits, light enough for landscapes, and compact enough for street photography, f/1.8 lenses have it all.

If you’re just getting started with your kit, the high-quality f/1.8 lenses are an excellent choice. They have great versatility thanks to their shallow depth of field, yet aren’t so sparse that they lack visual impact.

I haven’t come across anything else that comes close to it in terms of precision and optical performance. While there are other types of lenses, such as the high-element huge f/1.4 GM lenses, these are in a league of their own.

With 12 lens elements, including two ED and aspherical elements each, the Nikkor Z 50mm f/1.8 S comes with a fairly complex optical design. In addition, it carries the S designation, which Nikon reserves for the high-end lenses in the new Z portfolio.

Thanks to its built-in stepping motor, this lens can make focusing adjustments quickly and quietly. However, it is not a completely noiseless drive, so an extra microphone will be necessary if you intend to use it for videography.

Pros
  • Fast and reliable autofocus performance
  • Minimal distortion
  • Amazingly sharp
  • Solid vignetting performance
  • No focus breathing
  • Great bokeh
  • Great build quality
  • Handles nicely
Cons
  • largest and heaviest f1.8 lens
  • Inconsistent autofocus performance
  • AF is not as good in low light

NIKON NIKKOR Z 20mm f/1.8 S

NIKON NIKKOR Z 20mm f/1.8 S

Features

  • Focal Length — 20mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/1.8
  • Minimum Aperture — f/16
  • Lens Mount — Nikon Z
  • Lens Format Coverage — Full-Frame
  • Angle of View — 94°
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 7.87″ / 20 cm
  • Optical Design — 14 Elements in 11 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 9, Rounded
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — No
  • Dimensions (ø x L) — 3.33 x 4.27″ / 84.5 x 108.5 mm
  • Weight — 1.11 lb / 505 g

Nikon’s ongoing development of its mirrorless lens lineup means that photographers interested in astrophotography have more alternatives than ever before. Consequently, the Nikon Z 20mm f/1.8 S prime lens is rapidly developing into a niche piece of gear.

It lacks the adaptability of the Nikon AF-S 14-24mm f/2.8G, the ease of use of the Nikon Z 14-30mm f/4 S, the fantastic value of the Nikon Z 40mm f/2, and the novice appeal of the Nikon Z 14-30mm f/4 S. However, it features the same unwavering quality as the rest of the S-Line family of mirrorless lenses, as well as the same razor-sharp clarity all the way to the edges and the lower f-number that is so important for professional-level star photography.

It’s about as long as a regular zoom or longer-ranged prime lens, making it quite long by prime lens standards (4.3 inches).

The Nikon Z 20mm f/1.8 S really shows its worth in practice. The ability to use an aperture as small as f/1.8 is very useful for shooting celestial bodies. Using ISO 1000 and exposure times of 8-15 seconds, I was able to capture clear, clean images of the night sky. I used the Z7, which shows almost no noise at ISO 3200. The colors and lighting are consistent and the clarity is amazing all the way to the image’s edges.

If you’re shooting landscapes with foreground interest, this lens performs superbly well. The 20cm focusing distance is adequate for bringing a sense of scale and distance into your landscapes. When using it to lock on to the foreground, we found the autofocus was quick, accurate, and quiet, exactly what you’d expect. It rarely struggled during our test conditions, even in low light.

This lens is protected against the infiltration of dust, sand, and rain by a special sealing mechanism. Nikon’s weather sealing is top-notch across the board with their S Line Z mount lenses, and the 20mm is no exception.

What really wowed me, though, was how well it handled images taken indoors, especially in dimly lit environments like majestic churches and quaint older structures. This lens is so sharp that you can use it handheld and still get a good feel for a room, even in the dimmest of lighting conditions.

This lens is an absolute must-have if you’re serious about taking stunning astrophotos. It’s simple, sturdy, and built to accommodate any filter or accessory you might require.

Pros
  • Fast, reliable autofocus performance
  • Excellent image quality
  • Great build quality
  • Barrel distortion is minimal
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Longer barrel than most wide primes

NIKON NIKKOR Z 24mm f/1.8 S

NIKON NIKKOR Z 24mm f1.8 S

Features

  • Focal Length — 24mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/1.8
  • Minimum Aperture — f/16
  • Lens Mount — Nikon Z
  • Lens Format Coverage — Full-Frame
  • Angle of View — 84°
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 9.84″ / 25 cm
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.15x
  • Optical Design — 12 Elements in 10 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 9, Rounded
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — No
  • Dimensions (ø x L) — 3.07 x 3.8″ / 78 x 96.5 mm
  • Weight — 15.87 oz / 450 g

Nikon released their fourth non-exotic prime lens in their Z mount line, the 24mm f/1.8 S. This lens’s high level of corner-to-corner rendering makes it ideal for capturing a wide variety of subjects and settings, from interiors to breathtaking landscapes to portraits.

For full-frame cameras like the Nikon Z7 or Z6, this lens is optimized for a fixed focal length. Since the mount is compatible with both full-frame and APS-C sensors, you can also use it on the Nikon Z50. Therefore, it would be a good walkaround lens with an equivalent focal length of 36mm. If you’re shooting with a full-frame camera, your field of view is 84 degrees; if you’re using an APS-C camera, it’s only 61 degrees.

It shares the same minimalist form factor with Nikon’s other f/1.8 prime lenses from the Z series. When paired with the Z7 or the Z6, it feels perfectly balanced.

The incredibly fast Nikon Z 24mm f/1.8 S Lens is packed with innovative features, such as a 9-blade diaphragm that aids in producing attractive bokeh in wide-field photography and filming.

Furthermore, it boasts a fast and precise focusing system thanks to its multi-focus system and two independent AF drive units. Its bright f/1.8 maximum aperture makes it possible to work even in low-light situations.

The lens’s architecture comprises a succession of aspherical and extra-low dispersion elements to produce sharp, and vibrant images. Its particular elements and coatings ensure that this optical quality will be consistent no matter where you are.

Flare and ghosting are successfully muffled by the addition of nanocrystal and super-integrated coatings.

The lens mount’s metal construction gives the impression that it can sustain significant force. The Nikkor Z 24mm f/1.8 S has a very pleasing bokeh due to its maximum aperture of f/1.8 and its lens structure with 9 rounded diaphragm blades.

Pros
  • Nominal distortion and focus breathing
  • Quick, quiet autofocus
  • Very sharp
  • Compact
Cons
  • Omits fluorine coat
  • Expensive compared to F-mount
  • Oversensitive control ring

NIKON NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S

NIKON NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S

Features

  • Focal Length — 14 to 30mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/4
  • Minimum Aperture — f/22
  • Lens Mount — Nikon Z
  • Angle of View — 114° to 72°
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 11.02″ / 28 cm
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.16x
  • Optical Design — 14 Elements in 12 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 7, Rounded
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — No
  • Filter Size — 82 mm (Front)
  • Dimensions (ø x L) — 3.5 x 3.35″ / 89 x 85 mm
  • Weight — 1.07 lb / 485 g

The Nikon Z 14-30mm f/4 S is a mirrorless ultra-wide-angle zoom lens for the FX format in the Z-series. The front element of the Nikkor 14-30mm f/4 S isn’t bulbous like that of most wide-angle zooms, so you can use filters with it. Any Nikon Z6 or Z7 owner in search of a wide-angle lens will find this immediately appealing.

Because of its wide field of view and constant maximum aperture of f/4, this lens excels in landscape, architectural, and astronomy photography.

The lens’s optical design includes four extra-low dispersion elements and four aspherical elements, which work together to correct for a wide range of aberrations and distortion and bring about an exceptionally crisp, clear, and true-to-life visual experience. Flare and ghosting are muted with the help of nanocrystal and super-integrated coatings, resulting in more accurate colors and sharper details.

To go along with the optics, a stepping motor allows for fast, quiet, and precise autofocus performance as well as full-time manual focus override, making it suitable for both still and video use.

Its maximum aperture of f/4 remains constant across the whole zoom range, ensuring consistent performance and helping to keep the camera compact and lightweight.

To keep the overall length of the lens unchanged and to promote quicker focusing speeds, an internal focusing design is adopted, where only the internal lens groups are adjusted during focusing.

Pros
  • Fast, quiet, accurate autofocus
  • Minimal chromatic aberration
  • Extraordinary sharpness
  • Very lightweight and small
  • Front filter support
Cons
  • Noticeable vignette
  • Focus by wire can be frustrating for manual focus
  • Ghosting and flare reduction are not as good

NIKON NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/4 S

NIKON NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/4 S

Features

  • Focal Length — 24 to 70mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/4
  • Minimum Aperture — f/22
  • Lens Mount — Nikon Z
  • Lens Format Coverage — Full-Frame
  • Angle of View — 84° to 34° 20′
  • Optical Design — 14 Elements in 11 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 7, Rounded
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — No
  • Dimensions (ø x L) — 3.05 x 3.48″ / 77.5 x 88.5 mm
  • Weight — 1.1 lb / 500 g

Beginning its life as the default zoom for Z7 and Z6 purchasers, this lens is decent. The Z 24-70mm f/4, like other Z mount lenses that are not part of Nikon’s pro range, has a relatively stripped-down appearance.

The size and overall balance particularly strike me as remarkable. The 24-70mm lens fits naturally on the  Z7. Having quicker zooms for mirrorless systems is a perk of the f/4 design.

It has a contemporary look with minimalist aesthetics that should hold up well against future trends in industrial design. The optics are well-suited for the high-resolution Z7 and will allow you to maximize its capabilities. This lens is weather-sealed and fluorine-coated like Nikon’s first two Z bodies, so you can use it anywhere.

The 24-70mm f/4 is a good size complement to the Z7, which is rather compact itself. It weighs 1.1 ounces, has a compressed size of 3.5 by 3.1 inches (HD), and can accommodate 72mm front filters. To accommodate the zoom, the lens extends from 24 to 70mm, growing in length by about two inches.

There are no set focus marks or distances, and the electrical focus technology makes smooth, steady racking impossible to achieve, therefore I wouldn’t recommend it for manual focus in a video setting. However, when shooting video, the Z7’s autofocus technology excels, and it will rack focus flawlessly for you as you move from one focus point to another.

The lens consists of 14 elements organized into 11 groups. However, this S lens appears to be atypical in the placement, shape, and size of its elements. One of the four aspherical elements is constructed with ED glass, and there is a second ED element present. The S lens appears to have larger and more simplistic back elements compared to the 24-85mm, as well as slightly larger and more mobile inner elements (the ones responsible for focusing), which are also very close to the image sensor.

It’s an excellent entry point for photographers interested in the Nikon mirrorless system, and one that should continue its relevance as the system matures.

Pros
  • Light and compact
  • Great image quality
  • Silent and accurate AF
  • Minimal chromatic aberration
Cons
  • Control ring is too sensitive
  • Retractable design can get in the way of shooting
  • Strong vignetting, especially wide open at 24mm

NIKON NIKKOR Z 24-200mm f/4-6.3 VR

NIKON NIKKOR Z 24-200mm f/4-6.3 VR

Features

  • Focal Length — 24 to 200mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/4 to 6.3
  • Minimum Aperture — f/22 to 36
  • Lens Mount — Nikon Z
  • Lens Format Coverage — Full-Frame
  • Angle of View — 84° to 12° 20′
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 1.64′ / 50 cm
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.28x
  • Optical Design — 19 Elements in 15 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 7, Rounded
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — Yes
  • Filter Size — 67 mm (Front)
  • Dimensions (ø x L) — 3.01 x 4.49″ / 76.5 x 114 mm
  • Weight — 1.25 lb / 570 g

Nikkor’s first superzoom lens for their Z-mount mirrorless cameras, the 24-200mm f/4-6.3 VR, is a strong contender in the market. You won’t need to bring extra lenses or switch out glass because it can capture images from wide-angle to moderate telephoto.

When compared to large zooms like the AF-S 28-300mm for Nikon SLR systems, the Z 24-200mm f/4-6.3 VR’s size is quite manageable. The Z lens is 4.5 x 3.0 inches (HD) and weighs close to 1.3 pounds.

Fluorine is used to prevent smudges from forming on the front element, and there is also protection against dust and splashes. The integrated lens hood shields the lens from accidental damage and reduces flare. The lens features a 67mm thread so you can attach a protective filter, neutral density filter, or other filters.

The autofocus is quick but not as fast as that of a professional zoom lens like the Nikkor Z 24-70mm F2.8 S. However, manual focusing is easier and smoother with this lens. The lens has a graduated reaction, so you may make little modifications by turning the focus ring gradually, or you can make large changes by turning it quickly. When used for video, the breathing effect (a shift in perspective caused by adjusting focus) is negligible.

If you’re looking for a lens that can cover a wide range without sacrificing portability, look no further than the Nikkor Z 24-200mm f/4-6.3 VR. It takes clear pictures and has several characteristics only found in high-end optics, such as anti-smudge fluorine to prevent fingerprints on the glass.

Pros
  • Lightweight design
  • Good build quality
  • Accurate autofocus
  • Good vibration reduction
  • Stabilized optics
  • Big coverage range
Cons
  • No focus distance scale
  • Narrow aperture limits low-light use

Conclusion

Nikon’s Z system demonstrates the company’s prowess in developing innovative products that can compete successfully in the market.  The Nikon Z7 system is a tremendous success that reflects the diligence of Nikon’s engineers. Only a select few mirrorless cameras are compatible with today’s lenses, and this is one of them. I hope this guide helped you decide what lens to buy for your Nikon Z7.

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Written by
Bret Leon
Bret Leon is a photography enthusiast who indulges in all matters cameras, lenses, gears, themes, editing, trends, and the latest product releases. If he's not trying to freeze time by capturing moments during his grand ventures, you can bet he's looking for the next big content idea.