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Best Lens for Nikon Z50 (Ultimate Guide 2022)

Bret Leon Avatar
Bret Leon
10 October, 2022 • Updated 27 days ago
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I was excited to see Nikon enter the mirrorless APS-C market with the Nikon Z50 and bring the long wait for a Nikon mirrorless APS-C to a halt. The Z50 is an excellent, easy-to-use device that takes high-quality photos and has a nearly ideal design from an ergonomic standpoint.

Personally, I found the face/eye detection to be a great feature when shooting portraits thanks to its reliable autofocus. Its 20.9 APS-C sensor is superb, and it also records 4K video with great definition, 1080p video with impressive speed, and slow motion video.

Now, lenses that work well with the Nikon Z50 keep growing in number. The difficulty lies in the fact that there is no “correct” lens for every situation. But you’re in luck since I’ve compiled a list of the top Nikon Z50 lenses right here.

Our selection includes the best prime lenses, portrait lenses, zoom lenses, wide-angle lenses, and telephoto lenses that complement this camera model.

Related Post: 10 Best Lumix Lenses for Videography

QUICK OVERVIEW

Products Features
EDITOR’S PICK
4.9
+400
+400
NIKON NIKKOR Z 85mm f/1.8
NIKON NIKKOR Z 85mm f/1.8NIKON NIKKOR Z 85mm f/1.8
  • Angle of View — 28° 30′
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 2.62′ / 80 cm
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $800
  • Angle of View — 28° 30′
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 2.62′ / 80 cm
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $800
Check price
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TOP PICK
4.8
+150
+150
NIKON NIKKOR Z 70-200mm f/2.8 S
NIKON NIKKOR Z 70-200mm f/2.8 SNIKON NIKKOR Z 70-200mm f/2.8 S
  • Angle of View — 34° 20′ to 12° 20′
  • Tripod Collar — Removable and Rotating
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $2800
  • Angle of View — 34° 20′ to 12° 20′
  • Tripod Collar — Removable and Rotating
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $2800
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MOST REVIEWED
4.6
650
650
Nikon AF-S FX NIKKOR 24-120mm f/4G
Nikon AF-S FX NIKKOR 24-120mm f/4GNikon AF-S FX NIKKOR 24-120mm f/4G
  • Focal Length — 24 to 120mm
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 1.48′ / 45 cm
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $1100
  • Focal Length — 24 to 120mm
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 1.48′ / 45 cm
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $1100
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BUDGET PICK
4.6
+220
+220
NIKON NIKKOR Z DX 50-250mm f/4.5-6.3
NIKON NIKKOR Z DX 50-250mm f/4.5-6.3NIKON NIKKOR Z DX 50-250mm f/4.5-6.3
  • Focal Length — 50 to 250mm (35mm Equivalent Focal Length: 75 to 375mm)
  • Diaphragm Blades — 7, Rounded
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $400
  • Focal Length — 50 to 250mm (35mm Equivalent Focal Length: 75 to 375mm)
  • Diaphragm Blades — 7, Rounded
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $400
Check price
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Best Prime Lens for Nikon Z50

NIKON NIKKOR Z 24mm f/1.8 S

Features

  • Focal Length – 24mm
  • Maximum Aperture – f/1.8
  • Minimum Aperture – f/16
  • Lens Mount – Nikon Z
  • Lens Format Coverage – Full-Frame
  • Angle of View – 84°
  • Minimum Focus Distance – 9.84″ / 25 cm
  • Maximum Magnification – 0.15x
  • Optical Design – 12 Elements in 10 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades – 9, Rounded
  • Focus Type – Autofocus
  • Filter Size – 72 mm (Front)
  • Dimensions (ø x L) – 3.07 x 3.8″ / 78 x 96.5 mm
  • Weight – 15.87 oz / 450 g

Nikon’s NIKKOR Z 24mm F1.8 S lens for the Z series is among the company’s finest offerings. Even when shot wide open at f/1.8, it maintains pinpoint sharpness across the whole frame, making it my go-to lens for portraits. This one never disappoints.

The Z 24mm f/1.8 S is well-built, with a metal base, strong plastic casing, metal focus ring, and weather-sealing. Plastic beats metal in my book for a number of reasons, including portability and ease of use in sub-zero temperatures.

The focus ring is not mechanically attached to anything on Nikon Z lenses due to its internal stepping motors that allow for focus-by-wire. You can program it to execute various tasks, such as changing the aperture of the lens. Additionally, with the focus-by-wire system, it is possible to not only improve autofocus speed and accuracy but also provide more fine-tuned control of the Z50.

To ensure a firm and solid grip on the camera body, the metal lens mount features four locking ears. This means the Nikon Z 24mm f/1.8 S can’t tilt when attached to the Nikon Z50, as there is zero play in the mount.

The lens performs exceptionally well in wide-angle applications, thanks to its high resolution across the frame and its naturally appealing bokeh. Careful integration of an extra-low dispersion component corrects for a wide variety of distortions.

Almost regardless of lighting or subject distance, the mirrorless Z50’s focusing is incredibly precise. An upgrade of this magnitude is certainly desirable. The Nikon Z 24mm f/1.8 S stands out from the crowd of F-mount lenses because it is quieter, faster, and more accurate in its autofocus capabilities.

Its bright, fast f/1.8 aperture makes it extremely versatile in low light, making it great for urban landscapes and nature portraits. Whether you’re shooting in a bright studio or a shadowy alley, this lens will give you new creative options with the Z50.

To prevent dust and other debris from getting into the lens and the camera, Nikon incorporated a rubber gasket on the part of the mount that touches the camera. This extensively seals it to keep dust and moisture out.

However, there are some current issues worth pointing out. If you like to manually focus your lenses, you might be disappointed with the different feel of manual focus operation and a slight lag when manually rotating the focusing ring.

You May Like: Best Nikon Lens for Video

Pros
  • Excellent resolution
  • Quick, quiet autofocus
  • Nominal distortion and focus breathing
  • Dust and splash protection
Cons
  • Oversensitive control ring
  • Omits fluorine coat

Best Portrait Lens for Nikon Z50

Samyang 85mm F1.4

Features

  • Focal Length — 85mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/1.4
  • Minimum Aperture — f/16
  • Lens Mount — Sony E
  • Lens Format Coverage — Full-Frame
  • Angle of View — 28.9°
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 2.95′ / 90 cm
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.11x
  • Optical Design — 11 Elements in 8 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 9, Rounded
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — No
  • Filter Size — 77 mm (Front)
  • Dimensions (ø x L) — 3.46 x 3.92″ / 88 x 99.5 mm
  • Weight — 1.25 lb / 568 g

I’m thrilled to see Samyang’s lens design finally coming to fruition. Samyang has earned a remarkable reputation for producing high-quality lenses, initially in manual focus and more recently in AF, with great success.

If you’re a pro or an amateur photographer in need of a fast yet sophisticated prime lens, the Samyang 85 mm F1.4 deserves your attention. Compatible with APS-C and DX-format cameras like the Z50, it provides a focal length equivalent to around 120 mm.

The combination of the lens’s short telephoto focal length and large maximum aperture of f/1.4 produces strikingly shallow depth-of-field that will set your photographs apart from the rest.

It is built to produce great results even at wide apertures. The quick F1.4 aperture makes it a great portrait lens for tight headshots, working at a distance, or shooting in low light.

The new UMC (Ultra Multi Coatings) on the Samyang 85mm F1.4 AS IF UMC Aspherical Lenses contribute to their already impressively high light transmission and provide further protection against flare and ghosting.

When used at wide open, like at f/1.4 or f/2, the Samyang 85mm F1.4 produces pleasing bokeh that gives your photos a wonderful sense of depth and space.

The optical construction of the lens consists of 9 lenses separated into 7 optical groups, each having one aspherical lens element. Moreover, it has internal focusing (IF), which prevents the lens from becoming bulkier as it focuses.

The 85mm f/1.4 lens is a classic focal length, long-considered ideal for portraiture, along with landscapes, close-up sports, and low-light photography. 

Pros
  • Beautiful build
  • Excellent center sharpness and good edge sharpness at wide apertures
  • Aberrations exist but in small, non-destructive amounts
  • Beautiful bokeh
  • Eye AF works fantastic
  • Vastly improved manual focus ring and focus action
Cons
  • Autofocus can refuse to focus on close objects initially
  • Large focus changes a little slow in AF-C
  • Somewhat flare prone

NIKON NIKKOR Z 85mm f/1.8

Features

  • Focal Length — 85mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/1.8
  • Minimum Aperture — f/16
  • Lens Mount — Nikon Z
  • Lens Format Coverage — Full-Frame
  • Angle of View — 28° 30′
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 2.62′ / 80 cm
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.12x
  • Optical Design — 12 Elements in 8 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 9, Rounded
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — No
  • Filter Size — 67 mm (Front)
  • Dimensions (ø x L) — 2.95 x 3.9″ / 75 x 99 mm
  • Weight — 1.03 lb / 470 g

Another member of the launch lineup of fast primes for the new Z system is the Nikkor Z 85mm f/1.8 S. Especially well-suited for portraiture, its focal length is a traditional moderate telephoto. Having a maximum aperture of f/1.8 means it can be used for a wide variety of additional purposes and offers a lot of creative freedom.

With an f/1.8 maximum aperture, this fast prime portrait lens (made for FX-format Z-mount mirrorless cameras) allows for excellent depth-of-field management and use in low-light settings. Its sharpness is superb throughout the board, with the possible exception of f/22, where diffraction becomes more obvious than at wider apertures.

In addition, the NIKKOR S Lens contains two extra-low dispersion elements, which help to reduce chromatic aberrations and color fringing. As a result, your photographs will have improved clarity and color rendering. With its nine rounded aperture blades, out-of-focus areas are consistently softened for beautiful bokeh.

To lessen flare and ghosting, each lens element is coated with a nano crystal coat and super integrated coating. The NIKKOR S Lens is resistant to dust and moisture and features an electromagnetic aperture system for more consistent exposure control.

All contemporary Z f/1.8 primes, including the Z 85mm f/1.8 S, feature a streamlined design with minimal control features. A big focus ring and an AF/M mode switch are included. The latter is completely electronic and not connected to the focus motor in any manner. This enables the focus ring’s speed to be dynamically adjusted in response to the rate at which it is rotated, allowing for swift adjustments at high rates of rotation and fine-grained control at low speeds.

Using a stepping motor, the lens can make focusing adjustments quickly and quietly. However, it is not a totally silent drive, so an extra microphone will likely be necessary if you are serious about making videos.

Pros
  • Stunning optics
  • Quick and silent autofocus
  • Weather sealed
Cons
  • Control ring system is overly sensitive
  • Fluorine protection is omitted
  • Some focus breathing

Best Zoom Lens for Nikon Z50

Nikon AF-S FX NIKKOR 24-120mm f/4G

Features

  • Focal Length — 24 to 120mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/4
  • Minimum Aperture — f/22
  • Lens Mount — Nikon F
  • Lens Format Coverage — Full-Frame
  • Angle of View — 84° to 20° 30′
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 1.48′ / 45 cm
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.24x
  • Optical Design — 17 Elements in 13 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 9, Rounded
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — Yes
  • Filter Size — 77 mm (Front)
  • Dimensions (ø x L) — 3.31 x 4.06″ / 84 x 103 mm
  • Length at Maximum Extension — 5.82″ / 147.8 mm
  • Weight — 1.56 lb / 710 g

Nikon’s AF-S NIKKOR 24-120mm f/4G ED VR is one of the most versatile lenses available due to its wide-angle to short-telephoto focal length range and continuous f/4 maximum aperture.

When mounted on an FX-format camera body, its normal 5.0x zoom is ideal for landscapes, portraits, and weddings, making it a fantastic choice for a go-anywhere lens. On the Z50, the focal length is increased by a factor of 1.5, making it a potent long-range optic with a 35mm equivalent of 36-180mm.

When compared to variable-aperture lenses, such as the older Nikon 24-120mm f/3.5-5.6G lens (which had a maximum aperture of f/5.6 beyond 85mm) or the current 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G VR superzoom (which has a maximum aperture of f/5.6 beyond 105mm), the Nikon 24-120mm f/4 has an advantage of one stop.

Three aspherical elements and two extra-low dispersion elements are incorporated into the lens design to considerably reduce spherical and chromatic aberrations, resulting in an image that is both sharp and clear.

The 24-120mm f/4 has a thicker barrel than the previous 24-120mm model—roughly the same size as the Nikon 28-300mm. At 24 mm focal length, it’s noticeably smaller and lighter than either the 24-70mm or the 28-300mm lenses.

To reduce flare and ghosting, increase contrast and color accuracy, and produce high-quality photographs, a nano crystal coat and a super integrated coating have been applied. Optical support comes in the form of VR II image stabilization, which helps counteract camera shake so that handheld shots come out sharp.

The AF-S Silent Wave Motor gives the Nikon 24-120mm f/4G VR an autofocus motor that is both silent and precise, even in low light. The autofocus is lightning fast, noticeably faster than that of the 28-300mm lens.

A rounded nine-blade diaphragm promotes an appealing, out-of-focus quality that helps you use shallow depth of focus techniques. It has one major drawback: It doesn’t track fast-moving objects well.

Pros
  • Reliability even at larger viewing angles
  • The zoom level is set at 5x
  • Aperture remains fixed at f/4
  • Image stabilization
Cons
  • There is some distortion
  • Dim lighting in the periphery at larger angles
  • At full zoom, f/4 does have some softness

Wide Angle Lens for Nikon Z50

NIKON NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S

Features

  • Focal Length — 14 to 30mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/4
  • Minimum Aperture — f/22
  • Lens Mount — Nikon Z
  • Lens Format Coverage — Full-Frame
  • Angle of View — 114° to 72°
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 11.02″ / 28 cm
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.16x
  • Optical Design — 14 Elements in 12 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 7, Rounded
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — No
  • Filter Size — 82 mm (Front)
  • Dimensions (ø x L) — 3.5 x 3.35″ / 89 x 85 mm
  • Length at Maximum Extension — 4.49″ / 114 mm
  • Weight — 1.07 lb / 485 g

Given that it is the first ultra-wide for the new mirrorless system, the Nikon Z 14-30mm f/4 S was one of the most anticipated Nikon Z lenses.

The compact size of this lens is immediately noticeable, especially in comparison to other ultra-wide zooms. It weighs 485 grams, which is 15 grams less than the 24-70mm f/4 S that comes with the Nikon Z system, and is about the same size.

The 14-30mm is a compact, uncomplicated lens that is made almost entirely of plastic. Its modest weight makes it ideal for traveling (albeit high-quality plastic).

Nikon’s Z lenses contain a fluorine coating on the front element, which is a thoughtful addition that facilitates the removal of water, dust, and thumbprints with minimal smudging. The 14-30mm f/4 is no different; it features a front element that effectively blocks water and is still simple to clean.

Outstanding accuracy in both the viewfinder and live view modes makes the 14-30mm f/4 S’s focusing system stand out. The sharpness of this lens is also outstanding.

The optics are complemented by a stepping motor that allows for fast, silent, and precise autofocus performance as well as full-time manual focus override, making it suitable for both still and video.

A customizable control ring permits speedy, one-handed tweaking of numerous camera and exposure parameters. The Nikon Z 14-30mm f/4 S also features a button-free retractable barrel for when you need a smaller profile.

All the way through the zoom range, performance is consistent thanks to the maximum aperture of f/4, which also helps keep the camera compact and light.

Color fringing and chromatic aberrations are drastically cut down by four extra-low dispersion elements, leading to improved contrast and color accuracy. Both a Nano Crystal Coat and a Super Integrated Coating have been applied to the lens elements in order to reduce the amount of surface and internal reflections, which reduces flare and ghosting.

Autofocus performance is extremely smooth, silent, and quick thanks to the stepping motor, making it suitable for both stills and video.

Pros
  • Crisp optics with very little distortion
  • Easy to carry and not bulky in any way
  • Dust, splash, and fluorine protection
  • Front filter support
  • Quick, silent autofocus
Cons
  • Sensitive control ring
  • Noticeable vignette
  • Some distortion

NIKON NIKKOR Z 24-50mm f/4-6.3

Features

  • Focal Length — 24 to 50mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/4 to 6.3
  • Minimum Aperture — f/22 to 36
  • Lens Mount — Nikon Z
  • Lens Format Coverage — Full-Frame
  • Angle of View — 84° to 47°
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 1.15′ / 35 cm
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.17x
  • Optical Design — 11 Elements in 10 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — Rounded
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — No
  • Filter Size — 52 mm (Front)
  • Dimensions (ø x L) — 2.89 x 2.01″ / 73.5 x 51 mm
  • Length at Maximum Extension — 2.94″ / 74.56 mm
  • Weight — 6.88 oz / 195 g

Since the Nikon Z series has already changed so many things, it’s only natural that the standard kit lens will be next. To that end, Nikon has released the NIKKOR Z 24-50mm f/4-6.3, a full-frame, traditional kit lens with great performance.

When compared to the Z6/Z7 and 24-70mm f/4, the Z50 and 24-50mm f/4-6.3 provide a more compact full-frame option. It’s fun to use, and it has an ideal focal length range (24-50 millimeters) for most situations. The 24-50mm f4-6.3 is the lightest and shortest available mid-range zoom for the full frame. The clarity, uniformity, and brilliance are all hallmarks of Z’s work.

When set to 24mm, it excels at capturing interior spaces, exterior landscapes, and candid moments on the street. You can also increase your focal length to 50mm to take stunning close-ups of people, objects, and scenes.

When not in use, the NIKKOR Z 24-50mm f/4-6.3 retracts into itself and is just 51mm long. It’s beautifully balanced on the Z50 and is also extensively weather sealed so that it’s perfect for use as a walk-around, go-anywhere lens.

The Z50 mount allows the NIKKOR Z 24-50mm f/4’s back element to illuminate the edges of the sensor with sufficient brightness. With this technique, you can get extremely sharp, evenly lit photographs.

At wide apertures, three aspherical lens elements (AS) help to reduce coma and other distortions. Two elements of extra-low dispersion (ED) glass eliminate chromatic aberration and glare to deliver crystal-clear, high-contrast images.

When shooting with the NIKKOR Z 24-50mm f/4-6.3, you can rest assured that autofocusing and diaphragm adjustment will not result in distracting noise thanks to the lens’s fast and silent stepping motor. During video recording, it prevents focus breathing and refocuses seamlessly, so your footage seems polished.

When shooting a film, the NIKKOR Z 24-50mm f/4-automated 6.3’s exposure control ensures that the transitions between exposure levels look natural and seamless. You also have the option to manually change the aperture using a control ring that does not require any clicking in order to achieve smooth iris transitions.

The NIKKOR Z 24-50mm f/4-6.3 is weather-sealed to keep out dust and water droplets for optimal dust- and drip-resistant performance.

The lens’s optical performance is satisfactory. While not spectacular, the results you get from this lens are good enough that most people won’t be disappointed. This holds true over a wide range of focal lengths and apertures. Working in this industry, I’ve seen a number of different kit lenses, and this one is among the best I’ve used.

Pros
  • Captures sharp images
  • Smooth, silent autofocus
  • Minimal focus breathing
  • Dust and splash protection
Cons
  • Dim maximum aperture
  • Very short zoom range

NIKON NIKKOR Z 14-24mm f/2.8

Features

  • Focal Length — 14 to 24mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/2.8
  • Minimum Aperture — f/22
  • Lens Mount — Nikon Z
  • Lens Format Coverage — Full-Frame
  • Angle of View — 114° to 84°
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 11″ / 28 cm
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.13x
  • Optical Design — 16 Elements in 11 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 9, Rounded
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — No
  • Filter Size — 112 mm (via Hood)
  • Dimensions (ø x L) — 3.5 x 4.9″ / 88.5 x 124.5 m
  • Weigh — 1.4 lb / 650 g

Nikon’s claim that this is the world’s shortest and lightest full-frame f/2.8 zoom lens with a 14mm field of view is undeniably accurate, but that doesn’t imply the lens is particularly small overall.

It’s a fairly hefty lens, coming in at 650g (23.0oz) and measuring 124.5mm (5.0″) in length with a barrel diameter of 88.5mm (3.5″). It’s reasonably well-balanced on the Z50, with a slight “front-heavy” sensation that doesn’t much alter as you zoom.

The 14-24mm F2.8 S has a focus ring up front on the barrel, a zoom ring straight behind it, and a control ring toward the back of the barrel for fine-tuning your settings. It can be used to adjust the lens’s aperture, ISO sensitivity, and exposure correction. The manual focus ring and the control ring are particularly well damped, but the other two rings also turn smoothly.

This lens is capable of producing razor-sharp images across its zoom range, with its only real flaw being a predisposition to overly busy bokeh.

If you’re prepared to stop down a bit, the Nikkor Z 14-24mm F2.8 S delivers a terrific performance in terms of detail over its whole zoom range. I have no problem photographing single subjects at f/2.8 wide open, but when the picture calls for sharpness over the majority of the frame, such as with landscapes, buildings, or fields, I recommend stopping down at least two stops. Additionally, it is a viable choice for wide-angle videography and astronomy.

Pros
  • Sharp f/2.8 optics
  • Sturdy, all-weather build
  • Anti-smudge glass coating
  • Supports front and rear filters
Cons
  • Design not as ambitious as competitors

Best Telephoto Lens for Nikon Z50

NIKON NIKKOR Z 70-200mm f/2.8 S

Features

  • Focal Length — 70 to 200mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/2.8
  • Minimum Aperture — f/22
  • Lens Mount — Nikon Z
  • Lens Format Coverage — Full-Frame
  • Angle of View — 34° 20′ to 12° 20′
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 1.64′ / 50 cm
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.2x
  • Optical Design — 21 Elements in 18 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 9, Rounded
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — Yes
  • Tripod Collar — Removable and Rotating
  • Filter Size — 77 mm (Front)
  • Dimensions (ø x L) — 3.5 x 8.66″ / 89 x 220 mm
  • Length at Maximum Extension — 8.65″ / 219.8 mm
  • Weight — 2.99 lb / 1360 g

A professional-level telephoto lens optimized for Nikon’s mirrorless system, the Z NIKKOR 70-200mm f/2.8 VR S is a prime example of Nikon’s innovative optical design.

For the Nikon Z system, the 70-200mm f/2.8 VR S is among the most cutting-edge optics available. This is apparent in the lens’s premium build, cutting-edge features, and superb picture quality. It is an f/2.8 S-type designed for professionals and dedicated amateurs, therefore it has a higher quality build and optical system than the f/4 S-type models, which rely more heavily on in-built profile corrections.

Not only does it look and function slightly differently, but it also has a small OLED panel that shows aperture or focal length and gives you the choice to show focus distance with a depth-of-field scale below. Both the focusing collar and the control ring can be adjusted to suit your needs.

It has near-perfect sharpness and excellent performance in all other areas; furthermore, it is built to be a reliable workhorse that will last for years. There are a few minor issues, but they’re hardly worth mentioning and won’t influence your decision to buy.

Bokeh is incredibly refined as a result of a large amount of glass and the massive mount diameter. The colors and contrast are stunning, and the raw files appear exactly as beautiful as the JPGs straight from the camera.

Even if some third-party lenses have weather sealing and solid build quality these days, flagship lenses from well-known brands are still the ones with the fewest (or, in most cases, no) shortcuts. A trusted brand name is always the safest bet if you need your gear to withstand extreme conditions.

Pros
  • Excellent optics
  • Quick, quiet autofocus
  • Minimal focus breathing
  • Dust, splash, and anti-smudge protection
  • Teleconverter compatibility
Cons
  • Tripod foot isn’t Arca compatible
  • Premium pricing

Sigma 70-200mmF/2.8

Features

  • Focal Length — 70 to 200mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/2.8
  • Minimum Aperture — f/22
  • Lens Mount — Nikon F
  • Lens Format Coverage — Full-Frame
  • Angle of View — 34.3° to 12.3°
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 3.94′ / 1.2 m
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.21x
  • Optical Design — 24 Elements in 22 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 11, Rounded
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — Yes
  • Tripod Collar — Fixed and Rotating
  • Filter Size — 82 mm (Front)
  • Dimensions (ø x L) — 3.71 x 7.99″ / 94.2 x 202.9 mm
  • Weight — 3.97 lb / 1.8 kg

With such lofty expectations, I couldn’t wait to see how well the Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM Sports Lens performed.

When would you use a 70-200mm lens? Although there is a large list of situations that call for a focal length between short and mid-telephoto, portrait photography most likely takes the cake.

The 70-200mm focal length range is suitable for portrait photography since it encompasses a superset of the traditional 85-135mm portrait focal length range. Shot at 200mm, even extremely close headshots maintain a pleasant perspective for a wonderful look, with very little in the way of background subjects usually being visible.

The advantage of a constant maximum aperture of f/2.8 throughout the whole focal length range cannot be overstated. The imaging sensor receives more light, resulting in a shorter depth of field and improved subject isolation.

Sigma’s OS (Optical Stabilization) compensates for shake in the lens by up to four stops, substantially expanding the lens’s practicality.

This lens delivers excellent corner-to-corner performance over the entire full frame when used at 70mm. At 70mm f/2.8, this lens produces exceptionally sharp results throughout the frame, and there is essentially no noticeable drop in quality when stopping down to f/4.

Sigma’s Hyper Sonic Motor (HSM) powers the 70–200mm f/2.8 Sports lens. When set to its default “Standard AF” mode, the 70-200 Sports focuses quickly and quietly, with only a slight shuffling and clicks audible during the process.

Although the lens has a plastic-like texture, it appears to be solidly constructed, and the superb finish gives the Sigma 70-200 Sports a good reputation.

The Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM Sports Lens is aesthetically pleasing, constructed of high-grade materials, and dust- and splash-proof. It performs admirably and produces excellent results, with the help of optical stabilization.

Needless to say, this lens met my expectations. If you’re looking for a versatile telephoto lens, go no further than the Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM Sports Lens.

Pros
  • Pro-grade all-weather build
  • Good optical performance
  • Image stabilization
  • Internal zoom
  • Teleconverter compatibility
Cons
  • Some distortion
  • Heavier than other lenses

NIKON NIKKOR Z DX 50-250mm f/4.5-6.3

Features

  • Focal Length — 50 to 250mm (35mm Equivalent Focal Length: 75 to 375mm)
  • Maximum Aperture — f/4.5 to 6.3
  • Minimum Aperture — f/16
  • Lens Mount — Nikon Z
  • Lens Format Coverage — APS-C
  • Angle of View — 31° 30′ to 6° 30′
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 1.64′ / 50 cm
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.23x
  • Optical Design — 16 Elements in 12 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 7, Rounded
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — Yes
  • Dimensions (ø x L) — 2.91 x 4.33″ / 74 x 110 mm
  • Length at Maximum Extension — 7.59″ / 192.8 mm
  • Weight — 14.29 oz / 405 g

The Nikon Z DX 50-250mm F4.5-6.3 VR is a flexible super-telephoto 5x zoom lens that offers a 75-375 mm equivalent focal length in 35 mm full-frame terms when used with Nikon DX APS-C sensor mirrorless cameras.

To assist the control of spherical aberrations and distortion, it uses 16 elements in 12 groups, including one extra-low dispersion element, while the super integrated coating eliminates flare and ghosting.

The lens’s internal focusing mechanism prevents the lens barrel from rotating during focusing, and its rounded 7-blade diaphragm produces pleasing bokeh in the image’s out-of-focus regions.

The lens’s stepping motor allows for fast, silent, and accurate auto-focusing, with the option for constant manual override. If you want to take sharper photos while hand-holding your Z50, the vibration reduction image stabilization system can help you out by up to five stops.

The Nikon Z DX 50-250mm F4.5-6.3 VR, despite being a super-telephoto zoom lens, is surprisingly lightweight at just 405g / 14.3oz.

On the z50, the 50-250mm focal length range is similar to a 75-375 mm focal length on a 35 mm full-frame camera.

Chromatic aberrations, which manifest as blue or purple fringes along margins of high contrast, are barely visible at all except in the most extreme cases.

An extra-low dispersion (ED) glass lens element reduces color defects and glare for sharper, clearer images with outstanding contrast.

Telephoto lenses are great for getting close-up shots without having to worry about focus breathing. Like high-end cinematography lenses, the Nikon D7200’s Nikkor Z DX 50-300mm f/4.0-6.3 VR lens features an internal optical mechanism that suppresses focus breathing. Both the focusing ring and the zoom ring are virtually silent, allowing you to record video without hearing any camera noise.

Pros
  • Very compact and light telephoto zoom
  • Very sharp in the center
  • Little distortion or vignetting (after lens corrections)
  • Attractively priced
Cons
  • Limited brightness
  • Sharpness decreases at lower focal lengths in the corners

Conclusion

The Z50 is a compact and lightweight camera that shoots stunning photographs with little effort on the photographer’s part. I found it quite easy to shoot with and would recommend it to anyone who wants something quick and simple. If you were wondering which lenses work well with the Z50, I hope the list above helped you make an informed decision.

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Written by
Bret Leon
Bret Leon is a photography enthusiast who indulges in all matters cameras, lenses, gears, themes, editing, trends, and the latest product releases. If he's not trying to freeze time by capturing moments during his grand ventures, you can bet he's looking for the next big content idea.