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Best Lens For Canon M50

Bret Leon Avatar
Bret Leon
15 July, 2022 • Updated 8 days ago
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Best Lens For Canon M50
Among Canon’s EOS mirrorless series, the M50 is undoubtedly the most widely used model. After using it for a few weeks, I can see why it appeals to professional and amateur photographers and videographers.

This interchangeable lens camera strikes the perfect balance between high performance, easy handling, and affordable price. In terms of features, I was most impressed by the camera’s integrated electronic viewfinder. Thanks to its tilt angle function, it was a godsend for outdoor shooting in bright light.

But, that is hardly the icing on the cake when it comes to using the Canon M50. It has incredible image quality and an advanced function system that gave me more control over how I captured my images. But only when I used it with the proper lenses in varied situations did I get the best results.

Here are some of the best lenses for the magnificent Canon M50:

QUICK OVERVIEW

Best Lens For Canon M50

Products Features
EDITOR’S PICK
4.8
700+
700+
Sigma 16 mm f/1.4 (C) AF DC DN Lens
Sigma 16 mm f/1.4 (C) AF DC DN LensSigma 16 mm f/1.4 (C) AF DC DN Lens
  • Lens type – Prime lens
  • Lens Mount – Canon EF-M
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $500
  • Lens type – Prime lens
  • Lens Mount – Canon EF-M
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $500
Check price
at Amazon
MOST REVIEWED
4.7
1300+
1300+
Sigma 105mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM
Sigma 105mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSMSigma 105mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM
  • Lens Mount — Canon EF
  • Lens Format Coverage — Full-Frame
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $500
  • Lens Mount — Canon EF
  • Lens Format Coverage — Full-Frame
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $500
Check price
at Amazon
BUDGET PICK
4.7
900+
900+
Canon EF-M 22mm f2 STM
Canon EF-M 22mm f2 STMCanon EF-M 22mm f2 STM
  • Lens type — Prime lens
  • Lens Mount — Canon EF-M
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $200
  • Lens type — Prime lens
  • Lens Mount — Canon EF-M
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $200
Check price
at Amazon
BUDGET PICK
4.7
700+
700+
Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM
Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STMCanon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM
  • Lens Mount — Canon EF-S
  • Lens type — Zoom lens
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $100
  • Lens Mount — Canon EF-S
  • Lens type — Zoom lens
  • PRICE RANGE: Under $100
Check price
at Amazon

1. Sigma 16mm f/1.4 AF DC DN Lens

Best wide-angle prime lens and best lens for vlogging with the Canon M50

Sigma 16 mm lens

Description

As part of the Contemporary family of lenses for the Canon EF-M mount, the Sigma 16mm F1.4 is a stunner. I especially love it because it combines the top performance of the Canon M50 with its compact body effortlessly.

Originally created for APS-C EF-M mount mirrorless camera systems, this exceptional prime lens is still a standout today. This lens has a wide f/1.4 aperture, making it ideal for low-light or fast-action photography. The end result is a soft, creamy background with razor sharpness, deep contrast, and well-balanced colors. So you won’t have to worry about not getting enough light, even in cramped quarters.

The 16mm focal length gives you a wide angle of view and total control over the depth of field, great for capturing landscapes or crowded areas. Furthermore, if you’re a silent shooter like me, you’ll like the built-in stepping motor that makes autofocusing very smooth and silent. 

Another striking feature I absolutely love about the Sigma lens components is the  FLD (“F” Low Dispersion), SLD(Special Low Dispersion), and aspherical lens elements. They reduce lens aberrations and prevent distortion from entering the process, which could compromise the photograph’s integrity. 

The weather-sealed construction protects your lens from damage during adverse weather. The Sigma 16mm is a good choice if you’re looking for a wide-angle lens with a fast maximum aperture, excellent optical quality, and a reasonable price. It is the best for shooting YouTube videos, live streaming, and Zoom calls.

Also Read: Best Lens for the Canon Rebel T6

Specifications

  • Focal Length – 16mm
  • Maximum Aperture – f/1.4
  • Minimum Aperture – f/16
  • Lens type – Prime lens
  • Lens Mount – Canon EF-M
  • Lens Format Coverage – APS-C
  • Angle of View – 83.2°
  • Minimum Focus Distance – 9.8″ / 25 cm
  • Maximum Magnification – 0.1x
  • Optical Design – 16 Elements in 13 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades – 9, Rounded
  • Focus Type – Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization – No
  • Filter Size – 67mm (Front)
Pros
  • Compact and light considering its focal length and maximum aperture
  • Fast, accurate, and silent autofocus
  • Superb image quality
  • Very sharp lens
  • Great bokeh
  • The bayonet mount is sealed against dust and moisture
  • Lens hood included
  • Large and precise focus ring
  • The lens sells for a fantastic price
Cons
  • Lack of image stabilization
  • When used at a fast aperture, it may result in chromatic aberration
  • Heavy

2. Canon EF-M 11-22mm f/4-5.6 STM Lens

Best Ultra Wide-Angle Lens and Landscape Lens for the Canon M50

Canon EF-M 11-22mm f/4-5.6 STM Lens

Description

Versatility is the word I would use to describe the Canon EF-M 11-22mm. Why? Well, at some point when I was shooting my mini vlogs, I was at crossroads of how wide I should really go to get the outcome I was looking for. In a nutshell, this lens robbed me of my indecisiveness. Since I didn’t want to limit myself to a single focal length, the Canon EF-M 11-22 mm allowed me to experiment with the focusing range to capture a wide range of shots.

This lens has a 35mm equivalent focal length of 18-35mm, which makes it easy to cover a wide range of subjects in a single shot. Because of its wide field of view, it’s an excellent choice for landscape, vlogging, street, and architectural photography.

It comes with a built-in dynamic image stabilization that produces blur-free images that are sharp and clear. The stabilization is good for an additional three stops, allowing you to keep your ISO low by handholding at slower shutter speeds. This improves its performance, even in low-light situations.

There’s more. The aspherical and UD elements of this lens work together to minimize the effects of chromatic aberrations on the final image. The elements eliminate flare and ghosting to provide you with enhanced sharpness. It also has a built-in stepping motor that offers quick continuous autofocus. Additionally, the camera’s silent autofocus function aids in keeping the subject in focus with incredible precision. If you’re a filmmaker using a Canon M50, this lens should be in your arsenal.

Specifications

  • Focal Length — 11 to 22mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/4 to 5.6
  • Minimum Aperture — f/22 to 32
  • Lens type — Zoom lens
  • Lens Mount — Canon EF-M
  • Lens Format Coverage — APS-C
  • Angle of View — 102° 10′ to 63° 30′
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 5.91″ / 0.15 m
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.3x
  • Optical Design — 12 Elements in 9 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 7
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — Yes
  • Filter Size — 55 mm (Front)
  • Length at Maximum Extension — 2.87″ / 73 mm
Pros
  • Excellent sharpness 
  • Crisp from edge to edge
  • Quiet and fast focusing
  • Sturdy build
  • Compact
  • Good optical stabilization
Cons
  • Fall-off is an issue when shooting RAW
  • Some distortion
  • Lens hood not included

3. Sigma 56mm F1.4 DC DN

Best Portrait Lens for the Canon M50

Sigma 56mm F1.4 DC DN

Description

The first thing I consider when determining which lens to use is the type of subject I intend to shoot. The Sigma 56 mm f/1.4 is my go-to lens for close-up portraits. This is due to the lens’s unquestionable ability to produce a beautiful bokeh in the background. In addition, the camera lens’s build quality is solid, and its autofocus is impressive for its low price.

When shooting distant scenes, the 56 mm focal length of this lens is unbeatable. It has an aperture of f/1.4, allowing the lens sensor to receive the maximum amount of light. This helps the lens process for greater performance in low-light situations.

Its internal components also include SLD and an aspherical glass, which aid in overcoming aberration and producing a contrast-rich output. Furthermore, it boasts a multi-layer coating that eliminates flare and ghosting. It has a stepping motor for autofocus, which provides fast, steady, and accurate focus.

The Sigma 56mm is without a doubt a favorite portrait lens for your Canon M50. Now is the time to get your hands on an iconic lens like this one!

Specifications

  • Focal Length – 56mm
  • Maximum Aperture – f/1.4
  • Minimum Aperture – f/16
  • Lens type — Prime lens
  • Lens Mount – Canon EF-M
  • Lens Format Coverage – APS-C
  • Angle of View – 28.5°
  • Minimum Focus Distance – 1.64′ / 50 cm
  • Maximum Magnification – 0.14x
  • Optical Design – 10 Elements in 6 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades – 9, Rounded
  • Focus Type – Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — No
  • Filter Size – 55 mm (Front)
Pros
  • Compact and lightweight
  • Exceptional sharpness across the frame
  • Very high contrast
  • Good color rendition
  • Excellent flare resistance
  • Nice background blur/bokeh
  • Fast, silent autofocus
  • Excellent focus accuracy 
  • Very reasonably priced
Cons
  • Visible pincushion distortion
  • No image stabilization

4. Canon EF-M 22mm f2 STM Compact System Lens

Best Everyday and Street Photography Lens for the Canon M50

Canon EF-M 22mm f2 STM

Description

It’s a given that all bright lenses tend to vignette towards the corners, but the Canon EF-M f2 STM is quite the exception. When taking a few street shots, I was surprised by how soft the vignette was in comparison to its cousins, which have a reputation for hard vignettes caused by partial obstruction. This makes it arguably one of the best lenses Canon has ever made.

On top of that, it has a wide focal length of 22 mm, making it great for landscapes, streets, and architectural photography. It has a fast f/2 aperture which makes photography in low light a lot easier.

The stepping motor provides smooth continuous autofocus with minimal focusing, allowing you to get closer to your subject without physically shifting your position. The aspheric lens element improves image quality by removing aberrations and lowering distorting factors, resulting in incredibly clear photos with high contrast. Purchasing the Canon EF-M 22mm is an investment that cannot go wrong.

Specifications

  • Focal Length — 22mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/2
  • Minimum Aperture — f/22
  • Lens type — Prime lens
  • Lens Mount — Canon EF-M
  • Lens Format Coverage — APS-C
  • Angle of View — 63° 30′
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 5.91″ / 15 cm
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.5x
  • Macro Reproduction Ratio — 1:2
  • Optical Design — 7 Elements in 6 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 7
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — No
  • Filter Size — 43 mm (Front)
Pros
  • Fast aperture
  • Just 105g in weight
  • Solid performance
  • Great for both photo & video
  • Pleasing bokeh
  • Great in low light
Cons
  • No hood supplied
  • Lacks image stabilization
  • Not weather-sealed

5. Sigma 105mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM Macro Lens

Best Macro Lens for the Canon M50

Sigma 105mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM

Description

When it comes to the Sigma 105 mm, I mostly use it for its macro features. It captures close-up subjects with superb sharpness and contrast. Being a dedicated macro lens, it goes down to 1:1 life-size.  

The 105mm focal length produces fantastic macro shots with impressively enriching perspectives of the subject. For a more artistic result, you can move closer to your subject of choice with its steady zoom that provides exceptional clarity. It sports a revolutionary hypersonic motor run that provides autofocus stability and quietness at high speeds.

With my preference for a hands-on approach to photography, I greatly enjoy its manual focus option even when it is set to autofocus mode. It has a visual stabilizer that ensures great optical production with no distortion or shakiness when shooting handheld close-ups. Its nine-blade diaphragm provides stability by creating a pleasant blur in the out-of-focus area.

This lens has an optical formula consisting of SLD glass that corrects curvature, chromatic, and spherical aberrations. The Super Multi-Layer Coating reduces flare and ghosting, which gives you high-quality photos with even color balance. With its improved optical specifications, the Sigma 105 mm f/2.8 is the best macro lens for Canon M50. What’s holding you back from getting this incredible macro lens?

Specifications

  • Focal Length – 105mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/2.8
  • Minimum Aperture — f/22
  • Lens Mount — Canon EF
  • Lens Format Coverage — Full-Frame
  • Angle of View — 23.3°
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 1.02′ / 31.2 cm
  • Maximum Magnification — 1x
  • Macro Reproduction Ratio — 1:1
  • Optical Design — 16 Elements in 11 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 9, Rounded
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — Yes
  • Filter Size — 62 mm (Front)
  • Length at Maximum Extension — 4.97″ / 126.2 mm
Pros
  • Excellent performance/image quality
  • Comfortable full-macro working distance
  • Useful OS for general shooting
Cons
  • Not weather-sealed
  • Incompatible with Sigma’s USB Dock

6. Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Lens

Best Light Travel Lens for the Canon M50

Canon EF-S 18-55mm f3.5-5.6 IS STM

Description

I like traveling a lot. It takes me out of my comfort zone and constantly challenges me to explore new surroundings and engage with different people. And you can bet your bottom dollar I do not leave my gear behind. My preference is to travel with light lenses, which is why the Canon EF 18-55 is typically one of my first picks.

Its lightweight design and non-retracting body make it incredibly portable. I’d even pack this lens for just in case situations. The 18-55mm focal length provides a wide range of shifting focal lengths, allowing for quick and easy re-framing of a view as you move closer to the subject. It contains a high-level motor that efficiently reduces distorting agents and allows for precise focus, resulting in sharp images with balanced colors.

This lens produces four-stop active image stabilization, which reduces shake and blur during handheld shooting. The new super spectra coating further eliminates flare and ghosting, resulting in even better colors in contrast with the Canon M50. Order yours today!

Specifications

  • Focal Length — 18 to 55mm 
  • Maximum Aperture — f/3.5 to 5.6
  • Minimum Aperture — f/22 to 38
  • Lens Mount — Canon EF-S
  • Lens type — Zoom lens
  • Lens Format Coverage — APS-C
  • Angle of View — 74° 20′ to 27° 50′
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 9.84″ / 25 cm
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.34x
  • Optical Design — 11 Elements in 9 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 6, Rounded
  • Focus Type  — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — Yes
  • Filter Size — 58 mm (Front)
  • Length at Maximum Extension — 3.19″ / 81 mm
Pros
  • Very sharp
  • Incredible optical stabilization
  • Good value for money
Cons
  • A bit of color fringing and distortion

7. Canon EF-M 18-150mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM Lens

Best All-Round Lens for the Canon M50

Canon EF-M 18-150mm f3.5-6.3 IS STM Lens

Description

Superzooms are one-lens solutions that cover a wide range of focal lengths, from wide-angle to mid-telephoto or longer. The EF-M 18-150mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM lens is Canon’s One Lens for the EOS M 50.

During my early years as a photographer, I got the opportunity to work with this amazing lens, and the results were nothing short of spectacular. With its 18-150mm range, it’s capable of handling any situation with ease. You can use it to shoot landscape, architecture, travel, or walk-around photography.

The built-in stepping motor provides near-silent focus, which is ideal for videographers. While zooming, its optical architecture maintains high accuracy illumination across the zoom range. It also includes an image stabilizer, which reduces camera motion by up to four shutter stops for more precise and sharp handheld shooting.

There is no doubt in my mind that you’ll want to keep this lens attached to your Canon M50 for a long time because of its outstanding performance. It’s definitely worth adding it to your kit.

Specifications

  • Focal Length — 18 to 150mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/3.5 to 6.3
  • Minimum Aperture — Not Specified by Manufacturer
  • Lens type — Zoom lens
  • Lens Mount — Canon EF-M
  • Lens Format Coverage — APS-C
  • Angle of View — 74° 20′ to 27° 50′
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 9.84″ / 25 cm
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.31x
  • Optical Design — 17 Elements in 13 Groups
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — Yes
  • Filter Size — 55 mm (Front)
  • Length at Maximum Extension — 5.04″ / 128 mm
Pros
  • Compact
  • Crisp optics
  • Surprisingly good sharpness across the frame at a variety of focal lengths
  • Focuses quickly, silently, and accurately
  • Effective IS system
  • Very useful 0.31x maximum magnification
  • Highly useful focal 8.3x zoom range
Cons
  • Soft edges and barrel distortion at 18mm
  • Plastic lens mount
  • Doesn’t come with a hood

8. VILTROX 56mm F1.4 f/1.4 AF

Best Subject Photography Lens for the Canon M50

VILTROX 56mm F1.4 f1.4 AF Autofocus Lens

Description

For my style of shooting, I find the Viltrox 56mm f/1.4 to be one of the best subject or portrait lenses on the market today. You can tell it’s well-made because of how sturdy it feels in your hands. And that’s not all. Viltrox took a unique approach to their aperture ring, being that it is non-stopped. The aperture ring does not physically click or step between the various aperture settings. In low-light situations, its bright f/1.4 maximum aperture is ideal, as is the lens’s ability to fine-tune the depth of field.

Having autofocus at its 56 mm focal length makes it easier to get the perfect shot with great sharpness. It has an STM stepping AF motor that is nearly silent and sufficiently fast, with autofocus that locks in precisely without hunting. The lens includes 10 elements in 9 groups, one ED and one HR element, and 9 rounded diaphragm blades that should assure good bokeh performance.

In 2022, you’ll get a lot of bokeh, great image sharpness, and incredible fidelity from the less expensive Viltrox lens. Grab yours today!

Specifications

  • Focal Length — 56mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/1.4
  • Minimum Aperture — f/16
  • Lens Mount — Canon EF-M
  • Lens Format Coverage — APS-C
  • Angle of View — 28°
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 2′ / 60 cm
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.1x
  • Optical Design — 10 Elements in 9 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 9
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — No
  • Filter Size — 52 mm (Front)
Pros
  • Focal Length — 56mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/1.4
  • Minimum Aperture — f/16
  • Lens Mount — Canon EF-M
  • Lens Format Coverage — APS-C
  • Angle of View — 28°
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 2′ / 60 cm
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.1x
  • Optical Design — 10 Elements in 9 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 9
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — No
  • Filter Size — 52 mm (Front)
Cons
  • Inaccurate autofocus
  • No weather sealing
  • Fairly shallow buffers
  • Single UHS-1 SD card slot

9. Canon EF-M 55-200mm f/4.5-6.3

Best Budget Travel Lens for the Canon M50

Canon EF-M 55-200mm f4.5-6.3

Description

With a focal length range of 55-200mm, this lens can cover a wide range of subjects that would otherwise be out of reach. This wide zoom range makes it ideal for portrait, street, and travel photography.

To add to its focus capabilities, the Canon EF 55-200 mm has a stepping motor that increases efficiency in concentration, giving out a definite focus with end-to-end sharpness. It sports an image stabilizer that minimizes blurriness caused by shaky hands, allowing you to get high-quality photos.

The aspherical and UD lens elements work together to compensate for aberrations that might degrade image quality. These reduce flare and ghosting, allowing you to see all of the fine details in your shots.

Specifications

  • Focal Length — 55 to 200mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/4.5 to 6.3
  • Minimum Aperture — f/22 to 32
  • Lens Mount — Canon EF-M
  • Lens Format Coverage — APS-C
  • Angle of View — 27° 50′ to 7° 50′
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 3.28′ / 1 m
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.21x
  • Optical Design — 17 Elements in 11 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 7, Rounded
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — Yes
  • Filter Size — 52 mm (Front)
  • Length at Maximum Extension — 5.04″ / 128 mm
Pros
  • Overall excellent optical performance across the focal range
  • Excellent contrast and color rendition
  • Compact and light
  • Nice design
  • Mechanically very functional
  • Great chromatic aberration control
  • Effective image stabilization system
Cons
  • A bit heavy vignette
  • Less focal range
  • Small maximum magnification

10. Tamron AF 18-200mm F/3.5-6.3 Di-II VC All-in-One Zoom

Best General Shooting Lens for the Canon M50

Tamron AF 18-200mm F3.5-6.3

Description

I am a rugby fanatic. One of the best things about rugby crowds and attending live rugby games is the friendly atmosphere, sense of fun and the action-packed pitch. These are the kinds of moments you don’t get at other live sporting events, and I always strive to capture them.

The Tamron 18-200 mm makes it incredibly simple to capture the action of a live game. Its focal length is great for sports photography, allowing you to capture an accurate shot of a distant subject quickly. Its strong zoom captures the objects perfectly.

It has sophisticated image stabilization vibration correction technology that effectively reduces the effect of camera shaking for handheld shooting. This lens’s superior LD and hybrid aspherical lens elements eliminate reflecting factors and aberrations, resulting in a clean, bright image with sharpness and contrast.

Specifications

  • Focal Length — 18 to 200mm
  • Maximum Aperture — f/3.5 to 6.3
  • Minimum Aperture — f/22 to 40
  • Lens Mount — Canon EF
  • Lens Format Coverage — APS-C
  • Angle of View — 75° 33′ to 7° 59′
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 1.61′ / 49 cm
  • Maximum Magnification — 0.25x
  • Optical Design — 16 Elements in 14 Groups
  • Diaphragm Blades — 7, Rounded
  • Focus Type — Autofocus
  • Image Stabilization — Yes
  • Filter Size — 62 mm (Front)
  • Length at Maximum Extension — 6.38″ / 162.1 mm
Pros
  • Great focal range
  • Lightest lens in its class
  • Moisture resistance sealing
  • Impressively low price
  • The rounded aperture blade produces quite decent bokeh
  • Well-controlled chromatic aberrations
  • Effective image stabilizing system
Cons
  • No full-time manual override
  • Flare prone
  • Not always tack sharp

11. Samyang 8mm F2.8 UMC Fisheye II (Black) Lens

Best Fisheye Lens for the Canon M50

Samyang 8mm F2.8 UMC Fisheye II

Description

Samyang lenses don’t include any electronics, so while you can use these lenses without an adapter, you’ll have to give up AF and a camera-controlled aperture. Like most fisheye lenses, the field of view is wide, measuring 180 degrees or to be precise: 167 degrees on the  Canon M50.

Fisheye lenses tend to be pricey. A fisheye zoom lens from Tokina sells for about $600 while Sigma asks for over $900. You can get the Samyang for as little as 360US dollars! If you expect such a low-cost lens to have poor build quality, you’ll be surprised that it’s actually rather fantastic.

Although the 8mm f/3.5 Fisheye lacks autofocus, this is practically a non-issue because of its wide field-of-view. Once you’ve got the focus distance set to 2 meters, you’re good to go. If you need to fine-tune the focus manually, you can use live-view. Setting the lens’s (working) aperture directly may take some getting used to, but in this case, it’s a reasonable trade-off.

Specifications

  • Focal Length — 8mm 
  • Maximum Aperture — f/2.8
  • Minimum Aperture — f/22
  • Lens type — Prime lens
  • Lens Mount — Canon EF-M
  • Lens Format Coverage — APS-C
  • Angle of View — 180°
  • Minimum Focus Distance — 11.81″ / 30 cm
  • Optical Design — 11 Elements in 8 Groups
  • Focus Type — Manual Focus
  • Image Stabilization — No
  • Filter Size — None
Pros
  • Affordable
  • Great contrast
  • Sharp
  • Great focus and aperture rings
  • Very easy to use
Cons
  • No digital contacts (so no aperture EXIF data)
  • No filter thread for filters
  • 100% manual

Conclusion

That brings us to the end of the lenses we’ll be discussing in this article today. What are your thoughts on these lenses? Which are your favorite Canon M50 lenses?

Let us know by leaving a comment below.

Bret Leon Avatar
Written by
Bret Leon
Bret Leon is a photography enthusiast who indulges in all matters cameras, lenses, gears, themes, editing, trends, and the latest product releases. If he's not trying to freeze time by capturing moments during his grand ventures, you can bet he's looking for the next big content idea.